In Defence of Mental Health Bloggers: Why Nobody Should be Made to Feel Bad for Speaking Out

So this week I’ve seen a few posts on Twitter which have concerned and baffled me.

That in itself is nothing out of the ordinary to be honest but I felt like this time I needed to respond in defence of my fellow mental health bloggers.

So the first topic I want to address is the hate I’ve seen for those who have “recovered” but are blogging on mental health from a retrospective point of view.

So, although I don’t believe you can “recover” from mental illness completely – I think you learn to manage your conditions to limit the impact they have on your life – that description largely covers me and a lot of fellow bloggers.

We are people who have been through awful times with mental health conditions but who have got ourselves to a point where the impact of our illness on our day to day lives is now limited.

We are not naïve enough to believe that our mental health will definitely not worsen in the future but we are well equipped to manage for now and want to share our experiences with others.

The reason I’m bringing this up is because of the Twitter conversation below. Rosie is an incredible mental health blogger and you should check out her work here.

However, she had people questioning the legitimacy of her mental health conditions, because she is now in a better place, and this made her doubt the fantastic work she does…

Twit1

Twit2

Criticising somebody for talking about mental health or trying to devalue what that person has been through is utterly wrong!

Everybody who talks about their mental health is aiding the cause of breaking down stigmas in society and there is definitely a place for “recovered” mental health bloggers.

We add value to the blogging community by being in a position to offer hope to others that their conditions don’t have to rule their lives forever.

We bring experience and advice with the aim of making sure that people (who often remind us of our younger selves) don’t have to suffer like we did.

We do not think we are better than anybody else in the community who is going through a tough time (we’ve been there!) and we pick up tips from everyone else to manage our on-going mental health conditions just like everybody does.

Ryan Ritchie summed it up best (it’s nice to see the good side of Twitter too).

Twit4

The second topic I want to raise is the hate for bloggers who ‘market’ themselves.

I think the tweets below sum up my thoughts pretty well…

Twit3

So let’s all support each other, yeah?

We’re all working towards the same goals of helping each other with our mental health and raising awareness. So let’s do it together.

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5 thoughts on “In Defence of Mental Health Bloggers: Why Nobody Should be Made to Feel Bad for Speaking Out

  1. Liz says:

    I know there is stigma, but hate? I am shocked to hear there are people who hate towards those with mental health. Anyone can be affected at anytime at some point in their lives. These haters will be lonely should they ever experience depression, anxiety or whatever other mental health issue then. I blog, which it helps me, but also now helps readers and followers of my blog, to know they are not alone.

    Liked by 1 person

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